Antonio J. Peña's avatar image.

My name is Antonio J. Peña, Postdoc at Argonne National. Lab., rCUDA original developer

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  • Is it common for senior developers to refuse to learn anything new?

    For the past few years, I have worked at a startup. Initially, I was hired for front-end work. At the time of my hiring, they also wanted a senior front-end dev. About six months after I started, they ended up hiring a senior developer. For purposes of this post, I will call her Amy. She is 42 years old with three children. Amy has strongly refused to learn AngularJS or other new technology. With the refusal, she delegated all of the Angular work to me in order for her to spend her time playing games online - not to mention, she will spend a ridiculous amount of time (months) compiling a CSS base, something that could have been done in about a week building off of Twitter bootstrap.

    Here’s an example of a normal 'sprint' for Amy and me. In this situation, an individual is assigned eight story points. This involves modals, custom checkboxes, forms that have error states and so on. These things also have to work with Angular and talk with a custom controller. Of course, Amy is unable to touch it! Things basically end up getting assigned to me and I get about 90% of front-end tickets. In total, I will end up having 20 story points instead of eight and Amy will get five.

    I just do not understand how a senior dev can get away with this type of behavior. I don’t know how it sounds, but I have reached a point where I would just like for her to be fired. I am not alone in my thoughts, there are a few other coworkers who agree about Amy and her laziness. What do you think would be the best way to go about getting this resolved?

    Antonio J. Peña's avatar image.

    First, I don't think it's common to refuse learning new technologies in our world, regardless of our experience or professional status.

    Regarding how to act, your best tool is your hard work. It should be noticed and rewarded by your supervisors. If you end up in a point where you don't feel it's rewarded, it may be time to talk to your supervisor about your feelings, and as a last resource, look for another job. When talking to your supervisor, I would never point to any of my colleagues directly. Instead, you should talk about yourself and how you see you are being rewarded for the work you are doing.

    Anonymous profile image
    Anonymous

    I like what @Antonio said here. Although it's tempting you don't want to bad mouth your co-worker even if they're being difficult and pushing the grunt work onto you. You can tell the supervisor the facts though. Facts are the truth and truth is that you've been doing all the tasks related to AngularJS and see what your supervisor says then. If not then it's time to move on.